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No.503617
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Lectures

Last updated 18.12.2019

Non Members are welcome

Date Speaker Subject (click for info)
12th Oct 2019
6.00 pm
Paul Lusty
9th Nov 2019
6.00 pm
Roy Starkey
14th Dec 2019
6.00 pm
Prof. Peter Worsley
11th Jan 2020
6.00 pm
Dr. Elsa Panciroli
8th Feb 2020
6.00 pm
Dr. Simon Drake
14th Mar 2020
6.00 pm
Prof. Chris Jackson
4th Apr 2020
6.00 pm
Dr. Karen Hanghoj

Venue - Please note the change to previous years!
Meetings will be held in future in the Geography Department of Nottingham University, which is in the Sir Clive Granger Building. Enter the university by the North Entrance, off the A52, and follow signs to the Main Visitor Car Park. As you turn right into the car park, the Sir Clive Granger Building is on your left [Nottingham University Map]

 
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EMGS INDOOR LECTURE PROGRAMME

Titles:
Into the abyss: exploring the mineral potential of Earth’s final frontier
Date:
Saturday, 12th October 2019 – 6.00 pm
Speaker:
Paul Lusty is Principal Economic Geologist at British Geological Survey
Abstract:

Growing demand for mineral raw materials, coupled with the increasing challenges of land-based mining and geopolitics will motivate the search for alternative sources of mineral supply, pushing resource development into frontier environments. A resource frontier currently attracting significant attention is the ocean floor, which covers more than two-thirds of the planet's surface and hosts a diverse spectrum of geological environments, geomorphological features and ecosystems. Metal resources on the seafloor have been known for more than a century and it is speculated that the seafloor may contain a metal endowment proportionate to its area. Extensive areas of ocean floor are now licensed for exploration and some deep-ocean mining projects are scheduled to commence operation in the next few years. As a consequence deep-ocean mining has moved from a distant possibility to a reality that could make an important contribution to metal supply and economic growth. Despite this optimism, there is a requirement for enhanced mineral exploration models, improved resource assessment, more robust economic evaluation, and the development of cost-effective exploration strategies and techniques. This presentation will explore these issues in the context of two case studies. The first considers the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse hydrothermal field, located at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, which is known for its seafloor massive sulfide deposits. The second case study examines the mineral resource potential of ferromanganese crusts, which develop on seamounts in the deep-ocean. These deposits can be highly enriched in ‘critical’ metals required for high-technology and green energy applications.

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Title:
Minerals of the English Midlands
Date:
Saturday, 9th November 2019 – 6.00 pm
Speaker:
Roy Starkey
Abstract:

The mineral wealth of the English Midlands has been exploited for centuries – lead, copper, zinc, and to a lesser extent silver, have all been worked. Deposits of coal, iron ore and limestone powered the Industrial Revolution, providing raw materials for such visionaries as Sir Richard Arkwright, Matthew Boulton, James Watt, William Murdoch and Josiah Wedgwood.

The area has produced a wide range of interesting mineral specimens. Examples of these are to be found in local and regional museum collections, and especially at the Natural History Museum in London. However, such was the importance of Britain in the development of mineralogy as a science that specimens from the English Midlands are to be seen in collections all over the world.

Minerals such as phosgenite, matlockite and mottranite are recognised as having been first described from the English Midlands. Although the glory days of mining are long gone, quarrying operations, especially in Derbyshire, Gloucestershire, Leicestershire and Shropshire mean that fresh exposures are constantly being created, and new mineralogical discoveries continue to be made today.

Thanks to the efforts of miners, mineral dealers and collectors over the past few hundred years, interesting and beautiful specimens have been preserved for us to enjoy today. This talk will provide an overview of the fascinating stories associated with the mines, quarries and minerals, illustrated by images taken especially for a recently published book Minerals of the English Midlands.

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Title:
Permafrost through Geological Time
Date:
Saturday, 14th December 2019 - 6.00 pm.
Speaker:
Prof. Peter Worsley
Abstract:

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(To be followed by our Christmas Cheese and Wine Evening - £5.00 - please remember to bring a glass)

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Title: Mesozoic Mammals
Date: Saturday, 11th January 2020 - 6.00 pm.
Speaker: Dr. Elsa Panciroli
Abstract:

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Title: Ignimbrites and associated rocks from the Paleocene Isle of Skye, NW Scotland and the Ordovician Upper Borrowdale Volcanic Group, English Lake District
Date: Saturday, 8th February 2020 - 6.00 pm.
Speaker: Presidential Address: Dr. Simon Drake
Abstract:

The talk will cover an introduction to ignimbrites, how they can be identified, classified (a la Branney and Kokelaar 1992). Recreation of eruption dynamics and ignimbrite complexities and deposition will be also covered. Examples used will include Paleocene aged volcanics from the Isle of Skye, NW Scotland and Ordovician aged volcanics from the Upper Borrowdale Volcanic Group (from around Coniston), in the English Lake District. Reference will also be made to 275 ka pyroclastic rocks from Tenerife in the Canary Islands.

I will also cover the exciting conundrums faced when trying to distinguish between ignimbrites and the recently discovered Paleocene aged Isle of Skye meteoritic ejecta blanket.

(To be followed by our Annual Dinner at the Orchard Hotel. Details in our next Circular)

A ‘Welded Tuff’ (Ignimbrite) from the Coniston area Borrowdale Volcanics
A ‘Welded Tuff’ (Ignimbrite) from the Coniston area Borrowdale Volcanics

A 'Fall Deposit’ (evidence of aqueous deposition) from the Coniston area of Borrowdale Volcanics
A 'Fall Deposit’ (evidence of aqueous deposition) from the Coniston area of Borrowdale Volcanics

A ‘Lava-like Ignimbrite’ from the postulated impact crater on the Isle of Skye
A ‘Lava-like Ignimbrite’ from the postulated impact crater on the Isle of Skye
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Title: Salt Tectonics
Date: Saturday, 9th March 2019 - 6.00 pm.
Speaker: Prof. Chris Jackson
Abstract:

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Title: The value chain of minerals for the green transition - a reflection on raw materials demand and supply
Date: Saturday, 4th April 2020 - 6.00pm.
Speakers: Dr. Karen Hanghoj (Director of the BGS).
Abstract:

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